Student Spotlight: What Paola learned from THE WOLVES

Being in a successful Off-Broadway play for a few months is equally exciting and tiring, but then add the fact that you are playing a teenage soccer player- yelling, running and stretching all over the stage and you have a recipe for utter exhaustion! Amazingly though, Paola handled it all with ease and grace. Check out what CWVS student Paola Abreu learned from her experience in the cast of THE WOLVES at Lincoln Center.

What did you learn about yourself and what your body needs over the course of rehearsals and performances?

It’s funny.  I think that every time I do a show I relearn preparation skills.  So I’d say that I was reminded that every day is different; some days my body felt warm already, and all I needed was a quick foam rollout and lip trills and I was ready to go, other days I would need a solid 20 minutes to reset, breath, and get juicy.  But everyday asked me to tune in to what was necessary to be present for the work to be done. Same goes with the cool-down (which we performers often forget to do).  After some shows, icing and self massage was super necessary, some shows a hot tea and a warm bath, some shows I just needed to go out and dance.  

How did your vocal and physical training/preparation support you in the run of THE WOLVES?

Oh well vocal and physical training is acting training.  There is no way that I would have been able to efficiently, wholly, and generously tell this story without the gifts training taught me.  The voice and body work together.  After all, your voice is in your body!  When your body is warm and ready, often so is your voice.  Learning how to tune in and bring myself to relaxed, attentive openness allowed me to be a vessel for the words and the story to come through me, rather than forcing things to happen the way I think they should.  If you have been blessed with a solid piece of writing, the way that Sarah DeLappe blessed this script, then the work is already done.  You just need to be able to get your body, heart, and brain to a place where the work can easily move through you and shape you throughout the rehearsal process.  Then when the play starts running, the rest of the work is being present, open, generous, and trusting that the story already lives in you, and nothing more need be done.  

 

Read the review of THE WOLVES here.

Technique is about Choices

The only reason for mastering technique is to make sure the body does not prevent the soul from expressing itself.
-La Meri-

The best feeling in the world is feeling completely limitless when singing a song- no obstacle in your way, no note out of reach, no melody too tricky to master. The worst is feeling like you’re barely scraping by in the piece, unable to make choices regarding interpretation or style because you are limited by what your voice can physically produce.

Mastering vocal technique gives you options, it gives you choices. It expands the realm of what is possible. Working on technique does not mean you lose that original sound only you are blessed with- it expands what your God-given voice is capable of!

One other thought on the topic of choices: developing good technique is understanding what variables took you from point A to point Z. Good technique is the sum of so many small things- the shape of your vowels, the looseness of your jaw, the relaxation or engagement of certain muscles, the balance of air flow and vocal fold resistance. What allowed you to get the full, released sound on the word “Love” on a high F? Can you identify the small choices that got you there? Eventually, it becomes intuitive.

Work to technically improve your voice, like a ballerina or basketball player might improve their body and game. You’ll find a world of possibility open to you!

Just Give it Time (+ Practice + Dedication + Lessons + Practice + Dedic…)

I guarantee you all of your favorite singers worked for years to get the voice they have today. Whether it was formal training with a teacher, or practicing along to Whitney’s riffs and runs in their bedroom for years on end, no one just #wokeuplikethis.

Guy Babusek said it well in a recent blog post:

“Some students will only book lessons when they have auditions or important gigs coming up. When there are no performances on the horizon, I never see them. This is not a wise way of working with a voice teacher at all. In these cases, there is no time to actually build a solid technique. These singers are trying to cram in years of training into small spurts sporadically. While this is better than no training at all, it is a very ineffective way of working. Solid singing technique is built over time, by taking weekly lessons and vocalizing daily in a systematic manner.”

I can’t agree with Guy more! The best time to start your vocal training was three years ago, but the second best time is NOW. Right this minute! Don’t wait until your dream role audition comes up, or you go into record your debut album next week. A great voice takes REAL time to train.

If you want to be a professional singer, or even just a good amateur singer, take RESPONSIBILITY for the time and effort it takes to accomplish something worthwhile. Recognize you won’t get their on your own. If you value something, give it the time, energy, and even money it deserves. In the case of your voice- book regular lessons and practice every day.

 

I’m Sick! Should I Cancel My lesson?

Last week I jumped on Facebook live to chat about what to do if you’re under the weather and feel like you should cancel your lesson. Hop on over to my Facebook page to see that in full. And we’ve already talked about sickness and singing here on the blog.

Just here for the highlights? Here’s what you need to remember if you’re thinking about cancelling your lesson.

  1. Know the cancellation policy and be prepared to pay for the lesson. For me and my studio, I send out my studio policies after your very first lesson- which includes my cancellation policy:

    For in-person lessons, if you make a cancellation within 48 hours of the lesson, you are responsible for paying the cost of the studio rental fee, which varies from $17 to $22 an hour. This also applies to re-scheduling.

    If you make a cancellation within 24 hours of the lesson, you are responsible for paying the total cost of the lesson.

    Sickness comes up, and I try to be as understanding as possible with my students as sickness arises. However, I hold all my students to this policy and appreciate their understanding of it. After all, they’ve known about it since day one!

  2. Feel something coming on? Cancel while you can. Back to the above- if you feel something coming on, chances are that stuffy nose will get worse before it gets better. Cancel before 48 hours and ensure you don’t have to pay any lesson fees. Be in communication with me- I want you to take care of yourself and get well!
  3. Have a show tonight? Audition tomorrow? Maybe don’t cancel. If you absolutely have to go on stage tonight or have an audition tomorrow that cannot be rescheduled, it may be useful for you to keep your lesson. I work with under the weather professionals often- it is valuable to learn how to warm up and cool down your voice specifically for when you are sick, and also how to get through a piece with congestion or slight swelling in your cords. *This is NOT a long term solution! Overusing your voice when you are not well can cause long term vocal damage. Some rare times, however, you may need to know how to sing when you are not at your best.
  4. There are other things we can do in a lesson besides sing! Come in and listen to and find new repertoire for your audition book. Let’s do a listening lesson, where we can analyze and assess other singer’s voices and find application for yourself. If you’ve already paid for the lesson, there are other valuable things we can do.
  5. You know your body- make the call for yourself. You are responsible for you and your voice- period! If you know you need time to rest and recover, please do. Be prepared to pay the full lesson fee if this is the case. If you have a stuffy nose, but your voice is unaffected, come on in and sing. It is your call and your voice! You only get one, so take care of it.

 

How to Audition for a Musical

abernadette_peters_live_0574-1Auditioning for a musical can be both thrilling and terrifying at the same time. As actors it’s important not to let our nerves get the best of us! Remember that the people in the audition are rooting for you to be at your best. They want you to be the perfect fit for their show! Here are six essential tips for nailing your next musical audition.

1. Come prepared

A wise teacher once told me, “Your first line of defense at any audition is preparation, second is concentration.” It’s normal and expected to be nervous when auditioning. The adrenaline and anxiety while waiting your turn and the thrill of the opportunity is natural. But nerves and fear are not synonymous. We are only fearful when we don’t know what we’re doing.

Check and double-check the audition requirements before showing up. Are they asking for a legit ballad, a comedic, up-tempo number? Will they possibly ask some people to stay and dance afterward? How many copies of your headshot and resume are they asking for? The more information you know the better. Once you’ve made your audition selections, practice! Work with a pianist so the first time you sing through your piece with accompaniment isn’t in the audition room.

2. Be yourself

Casting directors want to get to know YOU. Really, truly! If they are going to cast you in a show where you’ll be rehearsing and performing with the same group of people for an extended period of time, you better be likeable. Don’t waste their time with some persona of whom you think they want to see, just be yourself! Dress nicely, but in clothes you would wear in your real life. Choose material that shows a glimpse of your personality. Reputation is everything in this business, so present the best version of you.

3. Sing what you sing best

Choosing what to sing for an audition is often the most stressful part of preparation. Be aware of what the audition notice asks for – if you’re going in for the ‘80s rock musical ROCK OF AGES, your favorite Rodgers and Hammerstein piece is not going to cut it. Within the parameters of the genre asked for, sing what you sing best. Sing what you love, you’ll 131623402_11nfeel confident and perform your best. It’s in your best interest to have a full audition “book” of songs you sing, but staying up the night before to learn what you think is the absolute perfect song for the audition often works against you. Don’t chance forgetting the lyrics or cracking on the high notes because you chose to sing a brand-new piece.

4. Give the pianist the information they need

Make sure your music is clearly marked and includes the following information either in the music or written in by you: the song title and who wrote it, key, time signature, tempo, introduction, end point, and any cuts you’ve made. The pianist is your friend! Always assume they know the piece you are asking them to play, there’s no need to ask if they do. Clearly give them your tempo by singing the first line of the song- not by snapping or counting. Also, it’s not a secret what you’re talking about over there, so don’t whisper it like it is! Speak clearly and confidently, and be as concise as possible.

5. Be courteous

As a general rule in the audition room, speak when spoken to. The folks behind the table (often the casting director, a musical director, the actual director, and other various production personnel) have seen a lot of people that day and usually want to get straight to the point. Certainly say ‘hello’ when coming in, but striking up a long conversation about the new trick your dog learned over the weekend will be met with boredom and/or annoyance. They may ask you what you are singing, in which case, tell them! But there’s never any need to announce what you’ll be performing as if you were in an elementary school production. More than likely they’re familiar with your song. Thank those behind the table, and most importantly, the pianist, before leaving the room!

6. Leave it in the room

An actor’s life is primarily made up of auditioning. The best skill you can develop is to leave your audition in the room. Don’t dwell, fret, or obsess over it once you leave. Make a log of the audition in your audition journal (consisting of what the audition was for, what you sang and wore, and who was there), and then leave it be. Casting is 100% out of your control, and the sooner you learn that the happier you will be. We often forget that things like height, hair color, age, and costume size might be playing into the casting director’s decision. Our job as actors is to be prepared and to be our best selves. Leave the stressful job of casting to the professionals.

Don’t let inexperience be your excuse for not auditioning. Auditioning is a skill just like riding a bike, so you need to practice. Go to all kinds of auditions, and go often. The more auditions you go to, the more confident you’ll be and the better you’ll do, not to mention the more opportunities you’ll have to get cast. Remember these tips, be prepared, and most of all, have fun in the audition room!