It took me 24 hours to bake a pie

In our house, we have recently taken up pie baking. 

I’ve perfected cookies, we’ve kept our sourdough starter alive since April, clocked in tens of hours watching Great British Bake-Off. Now, It was time to take our baking up a notch. 

Two weeks ago Jordan and I stumbled across Erin McDowell on YouTube, teaching the masses the surprisingly complicated and beautiful intricacies of pie making. An hour and a half of tutorials later, we were hooked. 

The next week, we rushed out to buy her newly released cookbook, loaded our fridge with butter, and declared ourselves PIE MAKERS. 

Here’s how it started: Confidently!

Here’s how it ended: disappointed, confused, and an entire 24 hours later.

Oh, and I nearly burnt the apartment building to the ground. 

It took 24 hours from start to finish because I ruined the first crust in the oven as all the butter leaked out and smoked up our entire kitchen. So I started again, this time resting the dough overnight in the fridge. When I had finally cooked a successful crust the next day (or so I thought), I waited for it to cool, then baked it all with it’s tasty pumpkin filling. 

After hours of cooling time, we were ready to eat our creation!

But alas! The pie was (practically) raw when we cut into it and the bottom crust was decidedly soggy. We ended up BAKING IT AGAIN, which did set the center but turned the bottom crust into rubber. 

Did we still eat it? Sure did. 

Would I call it a success? No, no I wouldn’t. 

Here’s the thing: watching an hour and a half worth of instructional videos on YouTube does not make you an expert.

It doesn’t even mean you have a SINGLE CLUE about the thing you’re trying to learn. 

It is a start, and we all have to start somewhere. 

If you too are a bit underwhelmed by the progress you’ve made by only watching YouTube or TikTok instructional videos… why not get some personalized help in a lesson?

Or, get on my waitlist for my soon-to-be released Warm-Up Series. These guided vocal warm-up recordings feel like I’m there with you- holding your hand the whole time. 

Ah, it started so confidently. At right: before we cut into the pie to find out it was soup.

Thanksgiving is only a week away and I am NOT GIVING UP ON MY PIE MAKING DREAMS! (also, what else am I supposed to do all winter?!)

But, going into my next pie, I am going to follow the instructions carefully, take it slow, and keep my expectations reasonable. I’m not going to be good at this for a while, and that’s ok. For now, I’m going to take alllllll the expert help I can get.

Anyone have any pointers?!

One Take Wonder: Thoughts on Perfection

My friend Stephanie asked me to record a video performance of me singing any song of my choice for a virtual fall benefit program. I’m a mentor in her awesome organization, Women’s Artistic Leadership Initiative (womensali.org), and I was honored she asked me to perform. 

I chose a song I’ve sung a lot in the past, “How Could I Ever Know” from THE SECRET GARDEN (a musical composed by two women, so it seemed fitting). The day Jordan and I were set to record the song (wow ya’ll, the perks of being married to a killer accompanist), I thoroughly warmed up and we rehearsed it a few times before hitting the record button. 

In the past, I’ve spent hours on a self-tape project like this. It’s so easy to be hyper-critical of every sound and expression and want to record take after take in hopes of reaching perfection!

In my experience- perfection is never reached. Instead, what you get is diminishing returns. After a few good takes, each one after that gets a little worse as your voice wears out and your energy wanes. 

In the case of my “How Could I Ever Know” self-tape- we ended up doing only two takes. And… we kept and submitted the first one

What a breeze!

Don’t get me wrong- this is largely because I’ve spent years training, practicing and performing– even performing this exact piece. Without that kind of experience, I may not have had such a confident go of it right out of the gate. 

But also – and here’s the point – I’ve learned to let go of my idea of perfection. 

Should we always strive to do our best? Yes!

Doing your best is not reaching perfection. It’s doing your best in this moment under these circumstances. It’s not worth it to play the comparison game, particularly when you’re comparing yourself to a standard that doesn’t exist. 

Here’s the final video if you’re interested in watching.

As a side note- I thought my performance was better in the second take, but the audio recording didn’t turn out as good. And to that I say, c’est la vie!